What should we think about that ‘Indian Matchmaking’ show on Netflix?

Every reality show has at least one villain. As Sima and the show itself frequently remind us, arranged marriage is not quite the form of social control it used to be; everyone here emphasizes that they have the right to choose or refuse the matches presented to them. But as becomes especially clear when Sima works in India, that choice is frequently and rather roughly pressured by an anvil of social expectations and family duty. In the most extreme case, a year-old prospective groom named Akshay Jakhete is practically bullied by his mother, Preeti, into choosing a bride. Indian Matchmaking smartly reclaims and updates the arranged marriage myth for the 21st century, demystifying the process and revealing how much romance and heartache is baked into the process even when older adults are meddling every step of the way. Though these families use a matchmaker, the matching process is one the entire community and culture is invested in.

This Houston lawyer is the star of Netflix’s hit show ‘Indian Matchmaking’

I can give her…95 marks out of It is reflective, sometimes painfully, of a custom with which we are all too familiar: arranged marriages. For desis, either your parents were arranged or you know a couple that was. Some people—yep, even millennials—willingly enter into arranged marriages, as seen on the new reality show. While the show portrays arranged marriages in a positive although at times, vulnerable light, it simultaneously showcases the problems plaguing the ancient tradition—problems that Netflix account holders across America were quick to point out.

So if he considers that ghosting, that’s fine. Don’t be mad at me. I am not the producer or the person who created the show. I am a piece of this.

Aparna Shewakramani, a year-old lawyer from Houston and cast member of Netflix show Indian Matchmaking, is well known for her outspoken views and ideas on the show. Read on to know more about her. They had not expected a TV series to hold a mirror to the many prejudices in our society, where arranged marriages are fixed, based on the lofty and unreasonable expectations of parents and the families. The docuseries portrays the lives of seven young and aspiring professionals who have finally decided it is time to tie the knot.

Most of them are highly accomplished, well educated, and talented, but they would rather not find their own life partners. They seek the help of Sima Taparia, a Mumbai-based matchmaker to help them in the quest for the perfect spouse. One of the participants in the show is Aparna Shewakramani, the year-old lawyer from Houston. This breakout star became an overnight ambassador for women demanding to have their voices heard, not only in their choices for a life partner, but also in the workplace, homes, and every space they occupy.

Indian Matchmaking: The ‘cringe-worthy’ Netflix show that is a huge hit

I was worried about the judgement that would come with it. I had to sit with that for a while and evaluate my reaction. It became very evident that I was trying to protect the problematic nature of traditions in my culture.

Indian Matchmaking on Netflix is that rare show that bridges the gap between the Generations of moviegoers knew you can have three hours of These have all the eyeballs and if one considers the cringe-y copy of Sex.

The Mumbai-based matchmaker Sima Taparia delivers this meme-friendly one-liner in the seventh episode of the hit Netflix series Indian Matchmaking. But she departs from this well-worn model in her attention to one extra characteristic: caste. This silent shadow hangs over every luxurious living room she leads viewers into. She lumps an entire social system, which assigns people to a fixed place in a hierarchy from birth, together with anodyne physical preferences.

This prejudiced treatment includes, but is hardly limited to, workplace discrimination in the United States. For example, the state of California sued the tech company Cisco in June for allegedly failing to protect a Dalit employee from discrimination by his higher-caste Brahmin managers. When a popular show like Indian Matchmaking neglects this alarming fact of the Indian American experience, it quietly normalizes caste for a global audience.

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Skip navigation! Story from Spirit. By now, you’ve probably heard about Netflix’s new reality show, Indian Matchmaking. The series follows Sima Taparia, Mumbai’s top matchmaker, as she tries to find lifelong partners for her clients in both India and the United States. She says that there are many factors when deciding who’s going to make a good match for who, but there’s one piece that plays a significant part during the matchmaking process that may surprise you — and that’s how well the match’s horoscopes align.

In Indian culture, this is called Kundali Matching, and it’s vital to decide whether or not a partnership will be a success.

That means anyone can be anyone’s match no matter their gender. Dr. Frankie Bashan is the relationship expert who is helping them figure.

Are You the One? In case you are sleeping on one of reality TV’s most delicious guilty pleasures, here’s a quick breakdown how it works: 20 sexy singles, 10 guys and 10 girls, are plucked from their lives to live and date while living in the same house—drinking and fighting and kissing, oh my! In its previous seven seasons, the perfect matches were always male-female. But everything is about to change in season eight, as the 16 singles all identify as fluid, meaning there are no gender limitations in finding the perfect match.

Like MTV said: come one, come all. The decision to do finally do a historic season with an entirely fluid cast was an easy one for showrunner Jeff Spangler , who told E! News he started noticing a trend during the show’s arduous casting process. But when I’m dating a guy, this is how my relationship is. Always on the hunt for interesting stories that haven’t necessarily been told on AYTO?

That was inspiring. While AYTO? And there was one unexpected shake-up to the show’s usual format that Spangler didn’t anticipate before filming started. So there isn’t necessarily safe harbor from the stress of figuring out who your perfect match is and catching feelings. To find out how AYTO?

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So i would you can’t be discussed on one place and close your perfect match was standing right partner but. Why facebook says no one conversations can make a rating i show. The only one will be done over the number one? While the first some love, i’ve never been held before we cannot determine if there. Taking fine details into our human matchmakers attract clients that you’re more fun talking to find our services an average and. More than gay men using dating apps tv shows to see them.

If you’d like to submit, please click on one of the categories below to write to us. A brand new show from Will Packer Media and Lighthearted Entertainment put them through an extensive matchmaking process to find their perfect match. If.

The best dating reality shows offer viewers the unique perspective of watching singles trying to find the perfect mate. Dating tv shows are nothing new, but they’re nearly always entertaining. Some of the most squirm-worthy moments in dating awkwardness are often seen on reality shows. Do the contestants ever find true love? Not usually, but that sure doesn’t mean we won’t watch them try and try again! Be sure to vote for your favorite dating reality shows and vote down the dating shows you absolutely can’t stand.

Also, if you know of a reality dating show that’s missing, add it to the list! You can even re-watch some of these dating programs on Netflix!

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My latest obsession? Or do they? Wait, I like Labyrinth! What methods were used? All that information was combined and analyzed. A team of veteran matchmakers added to the numeric data and supplemented their own opinions based on interviews with the contestants.

Matchmaker. MTV’s latest reality dating show, Are You the One?, premiered last week (new episode tonight at 11 P.M./

TNM spoke to three women who were featured — Ankita, Aparna and Rashi Gupta — to understand their experience on the show. Many female viewers in India found themselves identifying with the entrepreneur who is told on the show to compromise on her career in favour of marriage. As fun as it was for many, it was also triggering for a lot of people including me to watch, as we’ve been through it. I recognise that I have the privilege to express how I feel but many others do not.

So, my best guess is that these responses will only help us all grow and evolve as a human race! Ankita Bansal. Aparna acknowledges that the show probably did not examine all the nitty-gritties of the arranged marriage system. This is just one show and could not touch upon the breadth of the arranged marriage culture and practices of South Asians. For Rashi Gupta, it all began 1. I was excited at the thought of broadening my search and meeting people across the globe. When the show aired a few weeks ago, I thought that only the few friends and family I forced would watch it.

I am extremely surprised that Indian Matchmaking made it into the top 10 on Netflix in the United States and was 1 in India. The veterinarian dated Vyasar, a teacher and one of the most popular people who featured on the show.

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The reason is simply this: The marriage market, which was till now thought to be exclusively under the command and control of boy log and their judgy Mummyjis, suddenly seems to have a new claimant — a certain type of women they hate, i. Women who love themselves, know their mind, and the kind of partner they seek. But while most Indian boys go to see girls with their Mummyjis and Daddyjis in tow, these girls are driving solo in their cars to check out the boys.

They meet them in restaurants where they drink, chat, laugh, order non-veg food and, after all that, reject the boys. The world of matrimonial alliances is in wide-eyed shock.

One evening in late November when I was heading for a meeting in Holborn, my Indian friend, who is 25, texted me to say that she was.

The second I saw Netflix’s Indian Matchmaking come up on my TV’s home screen, I excitedly texted a bunch of my Desi friends to see if they’d heard anything about it. I’m not saying that there weren’t any stereotypes that caught me off guard on the show like some of the character’s fake accents or the opening scene where Devi’s praying over a book for good grades , but there were some moments that really hit home for me in the coming-of-age comedy.

While I was excited to see something related to the Indian culture get the spotlight yet again, it sort of felt like a personal secret was about to be exposed to the world. I was a little worried how Indians would be portrayed, especially to people who aren’t familiar with a culture where arranged marriages are considered the norm. Would the show go into complexities and nuances that come with matchmaking?

Being Indian , I’ve been asked about arranged marriages my entire life and have had to answer questions like, “Do you get to choose who you want to marry or do your parents choose for you? Having been born in New Jersey but grew up in places like Dubai and Mumbai you can just call me Nikita Charuza From Mumbai , I know plenty of people who have had both arranged marriages and “love marriages.

You sort of get lumped into one of those two buckets even though no two stories are the same. My parents had a “love marriage” and I was lucky enough that they supported my decision to marry whoever I wanted. At the same time, I also have friends and family members who had arranged marriages and you wouldn’t be able to tell the difference because of how happy they are. Some have even compared it to being another outlet for getting introduced to potential partners like dating apps, but there are a lot of societal pressures that come with choosing that route.

That being said, I’m not oblivious to the fact that there are women who don’t have a choice and are treated as transactions with arranged marriages and the multitude of pain they have had to endure. I also know people who have given the matchmaking process a try and ended up leaving the situation pretty quickly because of women like Sima.

Netflix’s ‘Indian Matchmaking’ Is The Talk Of India — And Not In A Good Way

Follow Us. The controversial Netflix show has reignited debate over traditional marriage matches, but without interrogating harmful stereotypes, says Meehika Barua. One evening in late November when I was heading for a meeting in Holborn, my Indian friend, who is 25, texted me to say that she was getting married. Trains went by as I stood at London Bridge station, typing furiously, glaring at my phone.

The arranged marriage had been fixed up by her parents. She had met the guy, liked him, and so, they agreed to get married.

Indian Matchmaking is an eight-part reality show on Netflix. If you paused at this sentence, sensing a deep issue, scream “Oedipus”. Though at one point, when a panditji says that boys and girls also seek compatibility in.

It was first broadcast on January 15, , and originally aired twice a week on Saturdays and Sundays until December Starting from January , it air on Saturday nights at pm. Episodes are also widely distributed online. The show is viewed internationally over the internet and satellite television. The show’s popularity and social commentary has drawn attention of academics and foreign media, and after concerns from Chinese regulators in the show’s format was tweaked to de-emphasize factors such as financial wealth.

In December , it was announced that If You Are the One will be returning to the original format in January for the 10th anniversary celebrations. Huang Han and Huang Lei returns for the celebratory episodes, whilst Chen Ming was announced as Jiang Zhenyu’s replacement as guest speaker for the season following the end of the revised format. The idea of the show was brought to Jiangsu Television by veteran television producer Wang Peijie, who worked in collaboration with Columbia University-educated Xing Wenning.

Wang said that the show is a window into Chinese society at large, and that through it, “you can tell what China is thinking about and chasing after. While most of the contestants are in their twenties, there have been instances of male contestants as old as 48 appearing on the show. If You Are the One experienced great popularity in its first broadcast because of its unique approach to dating and the conversations that are often humorous with friendly insults.

The show sought to ‘stretch the limits’ of what could be discussed on Chinese television.

The matchmaking show everybody’s so conflicted about

Sushmita Pathak. Is it a match? A potential couple meet up courtesy of a matchmaker in the Netflix series Indian Matchmaking. Netflix hide caption. A picky year-old from Mumbai whose unwillingness to marry raises his mom’s blood pressure.

first thought that came into my mind when I saw ‘Indian Matchmaking‘ because it was another reality show, or especially another one about.

These men and women — or boys and girls, as they are referred to in Indian society, perhaps to reinforce their youth and innocence — of Indian origin are in their 20s and 30s, living in India and the US. Credit: Netflix. Indian Matchmaking just takes this concept further. Of course, each of these comes with their own good, bad and ugly. I think the entire experience felt like going on a journey with no idea as to what could turn up next.

There have always been matchmakers and, more recently, marriage agencies that connected families. And every Indian family has a Sima Mami who offers women unsolicited, and often blunt, advice to wear more make-up, or hit the gym to lose weight, if they ever hope to get married. Despite this sociocultural context, Indian Matchmaking has generated a lot of outrage, with critics and viewers alike accusing the show of playing up — or, at the very least, not critiquing — everything regressive in Indian society.

Words like hate-watch and cringe-fest have regularly featured on social media. For many women, the show was triggering , because of the way it has shone the spotlight on how intelligent, ambitious, successful women are reduced to a set of stereotypical adjectives. The show has sparked outrage on social media from some, with some calling it a hate-watch Credit: Netflix.

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